Practical Microsoft Windows Millennium (Practical)

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I think we ought to mention this in the SDK. Once this bit of extra work has been done, you can now happily create a process that doesn't have access to much of anything — it can't access your stuff, and there won't be many places on the file system it can write to. Due to leaving users enabled, it can execute installed programs.


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The hackers out there are now thinking — but there's a bunch of attack surface still available — clipboard, global atoms, and window message attacks. There is that attack surface out there, but we can deal with that — stay tuned — more blog posts to follow. It needs to be a primary token, not an impersonation token.

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If you have an impersonation token, you need to use DuplicateTokenEx to get a primary token. It isn't important for what we're doing. Note that even if you try to drop all the privileges, it won't drop "Bypass Traverse Checking". IMHO, this really ought to be documented, but it's really to save you from yourself — huge numbers of API calls break if you don't have this privilege. SidsToDisable — these are the groups that we want to set to deny only. Even though we're going to use SidsToRestrict later on, it's still good to use this. I believe this whole function is backwards — we should be specifying the groups we want to keep, NOT the groups we want to drop.

Anything not in your list gets copied into the output list for removal. Don't keep authenticated users. Doing this efficiently is tricky, and is best done by digging through the guts of the SIDs in the list. PrivilegesToDelete — the simplest thing to do is to disable everything you can using the flag, but if for some reason you need some specific privilege for your app, you have to do the same thing as with the groups — get a list of the token privileges using GetTokenInformation, copy over the privileges that aren't in the list of privs you want to keep, and then pass that in here.

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The point here is that we keep inventing new and sometimes risky privileges, and you don't want your nice restricted process suddenly showing up with a bunch of new privileges because someone upgraded from Win2k3 to LH Server, or XP to Vista. SidsToRestrict — these are interesting. This is unfortunately not in the documentation, and I had to figure it out by experimenting. You can now add in any of the groups you want to keep, and you can actually make up completely different SIDs that don't map to any user and add those if you like.

This will be important later on. Wampiryczny blog says:. February 25, at am. I was interested in the book because of the interesting anecdotes shared by Mr. Chen in his blog, which shares the title with this book. There was plenty of nice anecdotes here, like the fact that the registry 'hive' got it's name by a developer who wanted to annoy his colleague who was afraid of bees. I think it would have served readers well I was interested in the book because of the interesting anecdotes shared by Mr.

I think it would have served readers well to write two books instead; one for the stories and another for the technical details of WinAPI. Dec 29, Phyllis rated it liked it. If you are a developer, or at least have more understanding of programming than I do a hair above zero , I think this would be a pretty interesting and informative read. Frankly, I ended up skimming most of it because I was just in over my head. As a marketer, I did get some insights into both user behavior and software programmer behavior and I certainly have more sympathy for what Microsoft has to deal with as an intermediary between both.

The writing is breezy and probably as entertaining as If you are a developer, or at least have more understanding of programming than I do a hair above zero , I think this would be a pretty interesting and informative read. The writing is breezy and probably as entertaining as a history about Windows will get from a developer's perspective i.

Full disclosure, I've known the author a long time, which is why I was interested in the book in the first place, so I probably wouldn't have picked it up otherwise. I was a bit wary about buying this.

M2 Windows XP Practical Questions

I've been an occasional reader of Raymond's blog for years which made me very aware this book had the potential to be well beyond my limited understanding of programming concepts and I was kind of right. While I did enjoy this overall there were big chunks of it that I just couldn't follow.

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That's not because of how it was written, just because the technical parts were beyond me. That said, the bits I did understand very very enjoyable and hearing about some o I was a bit wary about buying this. That said, the bits I did understand very very enjoyable and hearing about some of the reasons why certain parts of Windows are the way they are was a lot of fun. This is a sometimes entertaining journey down the ins and outs of windows programming and its tortured history. However, around two thirds of the way into the book I started to thing about the phrase "The common denominator in all your failed relationships is you.

I suspect he may be a little too steeped in the environment he's been in for so long that it's har This is a sometimes entertaining journey down the ins and outs of windows programming and its tortured history. I suspect he may be a little too steeped in the environment he's been in for so long that it's hard to realize that there are better ways to develop than against a 20 year old API is starting to look like Tetsuo in the last 20 minutes of Akira. There are only so many times that you can read 'lots of people got this wrong' in reference to an particular call or a common check done by many programs before you start to wonder if maybe there shouldn't have been a better way.

Jan 04, Mark rated it liked it Shelves: partially-read , programming-books. I'm calling this partially read because there were long sojourns into Win32 programming and code samples - COM isn't overly verbose, we swear! Now check out this 3 page class that I skipped over.

What remains is a large collection of genuinely entertaining anecdotes about Windows, the hoops the developers go through to make customers happy they didn't ship XP Service Pack 2 for awhile because Deer Hunter 4 didn't work on it and the crazy things that application developers do to try and make I'm calling this partially read because there were long sojourns into Win32 programming and code samples - COM isn't overly verbose, we swear! What remains is a large collection of genuinely entertaining anecdotes about Windows, the hoops the developers go through to make customers happy they didn't ship XP Service Pack 2 for awhile because Deer Hunter 4 didn't work on it and the crazy things that application developers do to try and make a buck one CEO wanted the Internet Explorer error page to redirect to his product's site.

You also learn about why Windows is the why it is. Why do I have to click on Start to get to Shutdown? Why do apps behave so strangely when you hook up multiple monitors?

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Nov 01, Joaobispo rated it really liked it. Very informative and occasionally funny, I read it for the "inside information" regarding the development of Windows, since 1. I skipped the parts with code details about the GUI interface, I was only interested in the "history" of Windows. This is where the book excels, explaining why sometimes things are the way they are in Windows yep, there can be very good reasons why this and that bug are still there. Dec 28, Ushan rated it liked it Shelves: computer-science. How the Windows API came to be, and why it is the way it is.

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If Microsoft has its way, perhaps eventually Windows will be emulated inside. NET is already as bizarrely grotesque as Windows. The book is a compilation of entries from the author's blog; unfortunately, it has nothing about Putin creatively interpreting the Russian constitution as if it were an incompletely specified application programming interface. Mar 21, Joshua rated it really liked it Recommends it for: geeks.

I work with Raymond regularly, and above I all, I really enjoy his wit especially as he applies it to sharing his wealth of experience and expertise. This book can get pretty techie at times, but it's constructed in such a way that you can take from it what you like and move on. Jun 10, Vasil Kolev rated it really liked it Shelves: history , tech. I definitely feel sorry for all the people that had and still have to develop under Windows.

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In this book I saw the decisions and rationales behind them, and most of them sucked horribly. Otherwise, the book is interesting to read, and the format of a lot of short stories makes it very fast to go through.


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May 10, Satyen Rai rated it really liked it. A nice journey down the history of Windows. A very good explanation of why some of the more painful things about Windows are the way they are - not that they are any less painful now. Jul 07, Deanna Earley rated it it was amazing Shelves: reference , computers. Great book with lots of anecdotes and little stories, as well as a great amount of detail into the inner workings of Windows.

Jan 13, Nihi rated it really liked it. A terrifying glimpse of the mad and perverse world of Windows programming, along with some insightful tidbits on the psychology of dialog boxes. Feb 20, Alistair Young rated it it was amazing. A fascinating, useful, and funny tour through the development and inner workings of Windows. Don't forget to read the downloadable bonus chapters, too. Jeremy Ryan rated it really liked it Aug 04, Prajwal rated it really liked it Jun 05, Itzjac Dagon rated it liked it Apr 29, Ryan Cumming rated it liked it Dec 17,